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Now that the legislative session is over, where do the Orca Task Force recommendations stand? Has progress been made? The BOLD team has the answers in this easy-to-read scorecard.

Now that the legislative session is over, where do the Orca Task Force recommendations stand? Has progress been made? The BOLD team has the answers in this easy-to-read scorecard.

Thank you to everyone who’s been following and engaging with their legislators to help critical bills get passed! There is still more work to be done in a lot of areas as you will find out in this report particularly in funding salmon habitat projects.

Let’s Talk Critically Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales with Colleen Weiler from WDC

On this podcast we typically closely follow the story of the Southern Resident killer whales, but on this episode we talk with our friend Colleen Weiler from Whale and Dolphin Conservation about her work on North Atlantic Right whales. Join us on a trip to the Atlantic Ocean to learn about these large baleen whales, ropeless fishing gear, shipping traffic, and ways you can help.

For information about Whale and Dolphin Conservation visit: whales.org

For more video podcasts visit our YouTube channel or listen on iTunes.

FREAK OUT AND SAVE RIGHT WHALES – Sign the WDC petition by March 1st, 2021

Learn more and take action on the SAVE RIGHT WHALES ACT!

Learn more about ROPELESS/ON DEMAND FISHING

Sound Action’s New Underwater Orca Camera – Amy Carey

Learn all about Sound Action’s new project – an underwater camera! This video and audio live-stream will hopefully capture orcas at a popular whale watching spot, Point Robinson, which is also an aquatic reserve in south Puget Sound. Executive Director, Amy Carey shares her personal story coming to protect endangered orcas and the work that Sound Action does to protect the critical ecosystem foundations – salmon, forage fish, and nearshore habitats.

For more information on the orca camera project and the full scope of Sound Action’s work as a shoreline development watchdog organization, go to www.SoundAction.org.

For more video podcast episodes subscribe on YouTube! For audio on-the-go subscribe on iTunes.

Restore Habitat in Bothell

Volunteer to improve habitat! Portions of Bothell’s largest park, the former Wayne Golf Course, are a migratory corridor for Chinook salmon in the Sammamish River and potential habitat for Coho at the confluence of Waynita Creek. As this amazing property transforms from a golf course into a public open space, volunteers are offered the opportunity to help improve the habitat. By controlling non-native and invasive weeds, and protecting native trees and vegetation, we’re able to improve water quality for salmon and down the line provide more prey for killer whales in Puget Sound!

Join us March 6th. We’re offering different shifts to ensure COVID-safe small groups (fewer than five people total). Consider signing up your household for a fun, educational, family outing.

Due to COVID precautions we ask all volunteers bring their own gloves, food and water, and wear mask. Those under 16 must be accompanied by an adult, under 18 need a signed release form by a parent.

Shifts are 9:00am – 11:00am, 11:30am – 1:30pm, and 2:00 – 4:00pm.

To sign up, please email director@whalescout.org with your name, requested shift start time, number of people in your group, and phone number.

We’re asking for firm, committed RSVP’s only. Upon confirmation, your spot will be held ensuring the group size does not exceed five people. Work party windows are short, please arrive promptly and stay the full time unless arranged ahead of time. Thank you for your cooperation!

Restore Habitat in Bothell – February

Volunteer to improve habitat! Portions of Bothell’s largest park, the former Wayne Golf Course, are a migratory corridor for Chinook salmon in the Sammamish River and potential habitat for Coho at the confluence of Waynita Creek. As this amazing property transforms from a golf course into a public open space, volunteers are offered the opportunity to help improve the habitat. By controlling non-native and invasive weeds, and protecting native trees and vegetation, we’re able to improve water quality for salmon and down the line provide more prey for killer whales in Puget Sound!

Join us February 7th. We’re offering different shifts to ensure COVID-safe small groups (fewer than five people total). Consider signing up your household for a fun, educational, family outing.

Due to COVID precautions we ask all volunteers bring their own gloves, food and water, and wear mask. Those under 16 must be accompanied by an adult, under 18 need a signed release form by a parent.

Shifts are 9:00am – 11:00am, 11:30am – 1:30pm, and 2:00 – 4:00pm.

To sign up, please email director@whalescout.org with your name, requested shift start time, number of people in your group, and phone number.

We’re asking for firm, committed RSVP’s only. Upon confirmation, your spot will be held ensuring the group size does not exceed five people. Work party windows are short, please arrive promptly and stay the full time unless arranged ahead of time. Thank you for your cooperation!

Restore Habitat in Bothell

Volunteer to improve habitat! Portions of Bothell’s largest park, the former Wayne Golf Course, are a migratory corridor for Chinook salmon in the Sammamish River and potential habitat for Coho at the confluence of Waynita Creek. As this amazing property transforms from a golf course into a public open space, volunteers are offered the opportunity to help improve the habitat. By controlling non-native and invasive weeds, and protecting native trees and vegetation, we’re able to improve water quality for salmon and down the line provide more prey for killer whales in Puget Sound!

Join us January 23rd. We’re offering different shifts to ensure COVID-safe small groups (fewer than five people total). Consider signing up your household for a fun, educational, family outing.

Due to COVID precautions we ask all volunteers bring their own gloves, food and water, and wear mask. Those under 16 must be accompanied by an adult, under 18 need a signed release form by a parent.

Shifts are 9:00am – 11:00am, 11:30am – 1:30pm, and 2:00 – 4:00pm.

To sign up, please email director@whalescout.org with your name, requested shift start time, number of people in your group, and phone number.

We’re asking for firm, committed RSVP’s only. Upon confirmation, your spot will be held ensuring the group size does not exceed five people. Work party windows are short, please arrive promptly and stay the full time unless arranged ahead of time. Thank you for your cooperation!

Upcoming Film, Searching for Chinook with Alexandra Johnston

Executive Producer and Presenter Alexandra Johnston joins the Whale Scout podcast to share an update on the upcoming film, Searching for Chinook. Footage was captured during the dramatic summer of 2018 on San Juan Island when J35 Tahlequah lost and carried her dead calf on a “tour of grief” and J50 Scarlet slowly and tragically perished despite an unprecedented rescue effort. Alexandra and the small team including Maisie Williams and Marina Nangle now work to complete the film during a challenging year. You can support their work by visiting their website and purchasing merchandise including sunglasses made from recycled marine debris.

Website: https://searchingforchinook.com/

Instagram: @SearchingforChinook

Please subscribe for more video podcasts on YouTube and iTunes! www.whalescout.org

Celebrate Orca Recovery Day!

Volunteer to improve habitat! Portions of Bothell’s largest park, the former Wayne Golf Course, are a migratory corridor for Chinook salmon in the Sammamish River and potential habitat for Coho at the confluence of Waynita Creek. As this amazing property transforms from a golf course into a public open space, volunteers are offered the opportunity to help improve the habitat. By controlling non-native and invasive weeds, and protecting native trees and vegetation, we’re able to improve water quality for salmon and down the line provide more prey for killer whales in Puget Sound!

Join us in to celebrate Orca Recovery Day, October 17th! We’re offering different shifts to ensure COVID-safe small groups (fewer than five people total). Consider signing up your household for a fun, educational, family outing.

Due to COVID precautions we ask all volunteers bring their own gloves, food and water, and wear mask. Those under 16 must be accompanied by an adult, under 18 need a signed release form by a parent.

Shifts are 9:00am – 11:00am, 11:30am – 1:30pm, and 2:00 – 4:00pm.

To sign up, please email director@whalescout.org with your name, requested shift start time, number of people in your group, and phone number. We’re asking for firm, committed RSVP’s only. Upon confirmation, your RSVP will hold your spot ensuring the group size does not exceed five people. Thank you for your cooperation!

Feds Won’t Remove Snake River Dams for Salmon, Orcas – Now What? Next steps with Joseph Bogaard

The federal government decided in July of 2020 to keep the four lower Snake River dams in place, knowingly turning against the best option for salmon recovery and for the benefit of endangered Southern Resident killer whales in desperate need of additional prey resources. With this long-awaited and expensive federal already decision made, where do we go from here? What steps can be taken to recover salmon in the Columbia and Snake River? We talk with Joseph Bogaard of Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition to hear what he has to say about the federal decision and what steps can be taken today to influence decision-makers for a better outcome tomorrow.

To learn more about Save Our Wild Salmon visit: www.wildsalmon.org

Check out their upcoming webinar about orcas and Columbia River salmon.

Talking to your elected officials is an important first step. Contact Washington State Governor Inslee, Senator Patty Murray, and Senator Maria Cantwell.

Read Whale Scout’s letter to Governor Inslee following the federal decision.

Please subscribe to our YouTube channel and on iTunes for more!

Researchers’ firsthand accounts of Tahlequah’s new calf, cause for celebration or concern?

Possibly the best news story of all of 2020, J35 Tahlequah gives birth to a new calf, just two years after her “tour of grief” where she carried a deceased baby 17 days and over 1,000 miles. We talk with Dave Ellifrit and Katie Jones of the Center for Whale Research who were both on the scene and took incredible photos documenting the newest member of J pod. They share what it was like to be on the water and the emotions that followed. After Tahlequah’s tragic loss two years ago, should people be celebrating or concerned? Dave and Katie weigh in.

All photos in this piece are credited to Katie Jones and Dave Ellifrit, Center for Whale Research.

To learn more about the Center for Whale Research on their website, Facebook, and Instagram.

Please subscribe on iTunes and YouTube for more!

Connecting Orca Science, Policy, and the Community: NOAA’s New Southern Resident Connections Blog

Sarah Fesenmyer and Michael Milstein of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration share a new blog series called “Southern Resident Connections.” The blog aims to connect the public with new and exciting research on the endangered Southern Resident killer whales and ways everyone can be involved. Hear about inspiring habitat restoration projects, microplastics found in killer whale poop, which salmon the whales are eating, how fishing seasons are being determined right now – and how you can make your voice heard.

Learn more about the podcast! Read the Southern Resident Connections blog. View NOAA’s brochure about Taking Action for Southern Resident Killer Whales here. Learn more about the upcoming Aug. 3-4 Pacific Fishery Management Council’s (Pacific Council) Ad Hoc Southern Resident Killer Whale Workgroup meeting. View the referenced Risk Assessment.

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